Friday, April 8 

8:00 am – 5:00 pm Fellowship Committee Meeting  

8:00 am – 5:00 pm Fellowship Examination  

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Fellowship Committee / Examinee Luncheon  

12:00 pm – 5:00 pm Executive Council Meeting 

Saturday, April 9 

7:00 am – 8:00 pm Continued Competency Assurance Exam 

7:00 am – 5:00 pm Registration 

8:30 am – 11:30 am CE Program #1 (3 credits)
                                   AAOMP Seminar – Pediatric Oral Pathology
                                   Christel Haberland (Chair) 

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm CE Program #2 (3 credits)
                                 AAOMP Symposium – “Even More Newly Defined (and Recently Refined) Head and Neck Tumors”
                                 Dr. Justin Bishop 

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm ADEA Meeting 

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm ABOMP Mid-Year Board Meeting 

5:30 pm – 7:30 pm OSU Reception (by invitation only) 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Emory Reception (by invitation only) 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm UPMC/Pitt Reception (by invitation only) 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Harvard Reception (by invitation only) 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Maryland Alumni Reception (by invitation only)

6:30 pm – 9:00 pm NY Presbyterian Hospital (by invitation only) 

Sunday, April 10 

7:00 am – 8:00 pm Continued Competency Assurance Exam 

7:30 am – 5:00 pm Registration 

7:30 am – 8:30 am Program Directors Meeting

8:30 am – 11:30 am CE Program #3 (3 credits)
                                    Updates and Diagnostic Challenges in Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology
                                    Dr. Scott Kilpatrick 

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Speaker/Education Committee Luncheon 

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm CE Program #4 (3 credits)
                                 
“The Wide World of Oral Ulcers”

                                  
Dr. Carl Allen 

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Welcome Reception

Monday, April 11 

7:00 am – 8:00 am Editors Breakfast (by invitation only) 

7:00 am – 8:00 pm Continued Competency Assurance Exam 

7:00 am – 8:00 am Education Committee Meeting 

7:00 am – 8:00 am Lab Directors Meeting 

7:30 am – 5:00 pm Registration 

8:00 am – 12:00 pm Oral Essay Program 

8:00 am – 12:00 pm Poster Board Setup 

12:15 pm – 2:15 pm Lunch and Learn (2 credits)
                                   
Gorlin Lecture – PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome: a precision healthcare journey

                                   
Dr. Charis Eng 

2:00 pm – 6:00 pm Poster Hanging 

2:15 pm – 2:30 pm Break 

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm Resident Slide Exchange 

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm Fellows Business Meeting 

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm Spouses’ Reception

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Residents Reception 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Indiana Reception (by invitation only) 

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm ROUR – Rest Of Us Reunion (registration required) 

Tuesday, April 12 

7:00 am – 8:00 pm Continued Competency Assurance Exam 

7:00 am – 8:30 am Poster Hanging 

7:30 am – 5:00 pm Registration 

8:00 am – 8:30 am Research Grant Presentation (.5 credits) 

8:30 am – 9:30 am Clinical & Translational Research (.75 credits)
                                   
Oral Pathologists and Scientists: A Focused Discussion on Research Opportunities and Research Careers
Dr. Blake Warner – Chair

9:30 am – 11:30 am Posters 

(Presenters must be at their posters from 9:40 am – 11:30 am) 

11:30 am – 1:00 pm Lunch on own 

11:30 am – 1:00 pm Past Presidents’ Luncheon 

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm Founders Seminar (4 credits)
                                   
Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors of the Head and Neck: Emphasis on WHO Updates and Novel Molecular Alterations
                                   Dr. John Reith 

6:00 pm – 8:00 pm Presidents Reception and Awards Ceremony – 2022-2023 Executive Council Installation (Awards ceremony at 6:45 pm) 

Wednesday, April 13 

7:00 am – 10:30 am Continued Competency Assurance Exam 

7:30 am – 10:30 am Registration 

8:00 am – 10:30 am Clinical Pathology Conference (2.5 credits)

CE Program #1 - AAOMP Seminar

Course Description:

Ten diagnostically challenging cases representing a spectrum of head and neck pathology will be presented as unknown cases. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature.

Objectives of course: 

1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions.

2. Analyze cases that present a diagnostic challenge and require correlation of histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis.

 

At the end of this course the participants will: 

1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification

2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities

3. Be refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions

4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities

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AAOMP seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.

Course Descriptions & Objectives

 

Click on a session below for more details
AAOMP seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.
CE Program #1 - AAOMP Seminar

Course Description:

Ten diagnostically challenging cases representing a spectrum of head and neck pathology will be presented as unknown cases. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature.

Objectives of course: 

1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions.

2. Analyze cases that present a diagnostic challenge and require correlation of histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis.

 

At the end of this course the participants will: 

1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification

2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities

3. Be refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions

4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities

AAOMP Symposium - Next Generation Immunohistochemistry

Course Description:

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has broad applications in diagnostic pathology, including diagnosis of broad tumor class (i.e., carcinoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, melanoma, etc.), tumor subtype, and site of origin. This course will present a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to tumor diagnosis, built on the backbone of an epidemiologically sound, H&E-driven pattern-based approach. Central to this contemporary immunohistochemical approach is the application of “next generation immunohistochemistry,” defined here as markers identified though discovery in the fields of molecular genetics and developmental biology.

This first half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to high-grade neoplasms of uncertain lineage, with discussions of broad tumor classes and associated screening markers, so-called “non-canonical expression” of these screening markers, the immunohistochemical workup of the small round blue cell tumor, and the concept of dedifferentiation.

The second half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to the carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), with discussions of carcinoma subtype, coordinate expression of CK7/CK20, and immunohistochemical algorithms useful in so-called “garden variety adenocarcinoma,” primary surface ovarian carcinoma vs metastasis, CUP at other sites, the distinction of squamous cell carcinoma from urothelial carcinoma, and site of origin assessment in NET and NEC.

Objectives of course:

The goal of this course is to learn a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to assign tumor type in high-grade neoplasms or uncertain lineage and to definite site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary. 

Judicious use of IHC is emphasized, in particular, because at present every oncopathology specimen should be considered a potential molecular pathology specimen. 

The discussion will be case-based and pitfalls will be emphasized throughout. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Understand the concept of “next generation immunohistochemistry” and how it applies to tumor diagnosis.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains, including screening and differentiation markers, for tumor diagnosis.
  • Recognize patterns of non-canonical expression of screening makers, so as to avoid diagnostic errors.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains to assign site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary.
  • Understand the concept of dedifferentiation and appreciate how it contributes to diagnostic uncertainty.
CE Program #2 - AAOMP Symposium - “Even More Newly Defined (and Recently Refined) Head and Neck Tumors”

A description of the course:

The head and neck area is home to some of the most diverse pathology in the entire body. In particular, neoplasms, both primary, by secondary involvement, and by metastasis, are myriad and biologic behavior ranges from essentially “harmless” to highly lethal. There are many uncommon tumors and diagnostic pitfalls.  Ideally, all pathologists would have experience and technical knowledge of the patterns and ancillary studies needed for these lesions.  Or ideally, would have algorithms and other resources from publications to guide them towards consistent diagnosis.  Experienced pathologists can navigate these waters, but the average pathologist in general practice sees these less commonly and is not as knowledgeable about the pitfalls, subtleties and new classifications, particularly those based on new molecular tests. This course is designed to inform participants about various newly recognized lesions of the head and neck, and to give the participating pathologists the tools, and importantly, the confidence to make these diagnoses on their own in practice.

Objectives of course:

  • To teach participants about the newest entities and classification systems in head and neck pathology
  • To teach participants to systematically approach diagnoses in head and neck lesions with clinical features, morphology, immunohistochemistry, and (when necessary) molecular testing. 
  • To teach participants the limitations and potential pitfalls of each diagnostic tool.

 

At the end of this course the participant . . .

  • Will be able to list an accurate differential diagnosis for a given head and neck lesion.
  • Will know the appropriate immunostains to order to address the diagnostic possibilities in a thoughtful, stepwise manner
  • Will be able to state the clinical (prognostic and therapeutic) implications for making a given head and neck diagnosis.
Dermatopathology

Course Description:

The focus will be on providing a practical approach to dermatopathology for the oral & maxillofacial pathologist.

Objectives of course:

  • Recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Will recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Will avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Will appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions
CE Program #3 - Updates and Diagnostic Challenges in Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology

A description of the course:
The course will provide a case-based, interactive presentation focusing on specific and diagnostic problems in bone and soft tissue pathology, especially pertaining to the head and neck region.  Audience participation is encouraged.  Topics to be discussed include but are not limited to WHO updates to small round cell tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma classification, pediatric spindle cell lesions, histiocytic disorders, and infectious mimics.  Emphasis predominantly will be on light microscopic features with clinical and radiological correlation; however, ancillary studies, such as immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic/molecular analysis, will be disused when applicable.

Objectives of course:

  1. Discuss the new and updated WHO classification of small round cell tumors.
  2. Explain the clinicopathologic differences among the more common histiocytic disorders of bone.
  3. Define “osteomyelitis” of bone from a pathologic perspective.
  4. Understand when to avoid as well as effectively utilize immunohistochemistry and molecular testing for the diagnosis of specific bone and soft tissue lesions.

At the end of this course the participant . . . 

  1. Confidently approach the differential diagnosis of common and difficult problematic areas in bone and soft tissue pathology, particularly of the head and neck.
  2. Discuss and recognize neoplastic and non-neoplastic diagnostic pitfalls in bone pathology.
  3. Know when to effectively and judiciously use ancillary techniques for the diagnosis of bone tumors.
Is this a ___________? Common and uncommon pitfalls and mimics in salivary tumors

Course Description:

Salivary gland tumors are often difficult to distinguish from one another.  However, non salivary type tumors may masquerade as primary salivary gland lesions as well, adding further challenge to tumor classification.  Nonstandard approaches are often required to delineate some of these mimics from true salivary gland tumors.  Conversely, salivary type tumors may masquerade as non salivary lesions, particularly at uncommon sites.  

Objectives of course:

Provide a framework and philosophy to resolve the rare but impactful scenarios of salivary gland tumors mimicking non salivary tumors and vice versa.

Utilize morphologic, clinical and immunophenotypic features to recognize mimics of the most common salivary gland malignancy, mucoepidermoid carcinoma

Outline approaches to identifying and categorizing mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors that present as salivary gland lesions

Document key findings important to recognizing salivary type tumors at uncommon head and neck sites.  

At the end of this course the participants will:

Recognize key histologic features that delineate mucoepidermoid carcinoma from mimics.

Identify morphologic and immunophenotypic features that should raise suspicion for non salivary type lesions including mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors.

Recognize features that can establish a primary salivary gland tumor at less common head and neck sites.

CE Program #4 - The Wide World of Oral Ulcers

A description of the course:

Oral ulcers are common, and most have rather straightforward diagnoses.  In a clinical oral pathology practice however, the range of diagnostic possibilities increases significantly, which can sometimes make this a challenging arena.  The purpose of this discussion is to share with you the way that I deal with these lesions, and hopefully provide some insights related to their diagnosis and treatment. 

The discussion will center on analyzing the various findings related to the patient’s medical history, the history of the ulcer, and clinical features of the lesion.  Usually this information will steer the investigation toward one or two general areas:  trauma/factitial; infectious; immune-mediated; neoplastic; or systemic.  Depending on which category is being considered, the diagnosis can be further narrowed down by other diagnostic studies, such as culture, cytology, or biopsy.

Management is based on a correct diagnosis, and the discussion will also focus on treatment of the more commonly encountered entities, including xerostomia-related ulcers and recurrent aphthous ulcers.

 Objectives of course:

  1.   Understand the importance of medical history of the patient, clinical history of the ulcer, and clinical features of the ulcer.
  2.   Help the clinician narrow down the likely diagnostic possibilities of the ulcer to one or two broad categories.
  3.   Help the clinician order focused diagnostic studies, if necessary.
  4.   Share my treatment strategies for selected oral ulcerative disorders.

 At the end of this course the participant . . .

 Should be able to narrow down the diagnostic possibilities of oral ulcers that present for clinical evaluation, order the most appropriate, cost-effective tests to confirm the diagnosis of the ulcer, and understand the most efficient methods of treatment.

Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Course Description:

The course will cover the most recent advances on clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects of neurocutaneous disorders, focusing, in each syndrome, on maxillofacial and oral involvement. On handling the whole group, and each specific syndrome, there will be a) a short introductory historical focus on the origin of the syndrome’s name and eponym(s) and on the persons behind the syndrome(s), b) their polymorphous manifestations and c) the most recent advances in their molecular and cellular biology new therapeutic protocols. The lecture will cover classical and mosaic phenotypes and the well-known genotype/phenotype correlations.     

Objectives of Course:

  • To familiarize pathologists with neurocutaneous disorders, which usually involve the maxillofacial and oral region and, in particular, with the facial cutaneous and oral mosaic phenotypes that can be currently investigated at the molecular level,   
  • To enable pathologists to distinguish, at a glance, the different forms of neurofibromatosis, the two genetic forms of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, the different forms of Sturge-Weber syndrome, the mixed phenotypes of the Cowden-Lhermitte-Duclos syndrome, the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, and other mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes with pigmentary and vascular manifestations, 
  • To familiarize pathologists with intra- and extracellular gene to protein and signalling pathways, and
  • To increase the confidence in the diagnosis when only soft clinical manifestations are available and how to take advantage from images and pathologic findings.

At the end of this course the participants will:

    • Be familiar with the names and eponyms and the women and men who led to the first descriptions and recognition of neurocutaneous syndromes and their underlying historical background,
    • Familiar with the different neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the maxillofacial and oral region, and in particular, with the mosaic and rarer neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the skin and nervous system,
    • Able to distinguish the different birthmarks leading to a diagnosis at glance, which is important for the purpose of follow-up and a correct genetic counselling,
    • Able to distinguish the main imaging patterns leading to a correct characterisation of neurocutaneous disorders, and 
    • Familiar with the most recent advances in genetics of these disorders and therapeutic strategies.
Gorlin Lecture - PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome: a precision healthcare journey

A description of the course:
Individuals with germline mutations in PTEN, encoding a tumor suppressor phosphatase, carry the molecular diagnosis of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). Subsets of Cowden
syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and autism spectrum disorder are umbrellaed under the rubric of PHTS. PHTS confers an 85% lifetime risk of female breast cancer, 35% of thyroid cancer, without a predominance of female thyroid cancer, and 25-50% of endometrial and renal cell carcinoma. Over 90%of PHTS have macrocephaly and 23% ASD. Recently, PTEN was established as one of the most common causes of ASD. As such, NCCN has codified practice guidelines based on our data, which have been replicated by others. We will discuss the evidence on which a normogram-based scoring system (Cleveland Clinic PTEN Score) aids any caregiver to identify individuals for referral to genetics professionals for consideration of PHTS; and the evidence for the NCCN guidelines, especially for routine enhanced surveillance.

How a single gene, when mutated, can result in two seemingly disparate phenotypes – cancer vs ASD – has been a puzzle. We will discuss our multidisciplinary approach to dissect this
bifurcation including genomic modifier and metabolic approaches.

Apart from enhanced surveillance, however, there are no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies for PHTS. PTEN signals down its canonical Pi3K/AKT pathway with upregulation of mTOR being a final common pathway. mTOR inhibition has been in clinical therapeutic trials, but we would like to see the seemingly undruggable PTEN be a therapeutic target.

Objectives of course:

  1. To appreciate the characteristics of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS)
  2. To understand the difference between a clinical diagnosis (Cowden syndrome, BRRC) and a molecular diagnosis PHTS
  3. To appreciate the seeming disparate phenotypes of cancer and ASD in individuals carrying germline mutations in one gene, PTEN
  4. To understand the scientific evidence behind the NCCN-PHTS surveillance guidelines
  5. To appreciate the fundamentals of developmental therapeutics in PHTS

At the end of this course the participant . . .

Will be able to utilize the normogram-based scoring system to identify prior probabilities for referral of patients of consideration of PHTS
Will be able to follow the NCCN guidelines
Will be able to understand the scientific evidence behind precision practice in PHTS

Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Course Description:

The course will cover the most recent advances on clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects of neurocutaneous disorders, focusing, in each syndrome, on maxillofacial and oral involvement. On handling the whole group, and each specific syndrome, there will be a) a short introductory historical focus on the origin of the syndrome’s name and eponym(s) and on the persons behind the syndrome(s), b) their polymorphous manifestations and c) the most recent advances in their molecular and cellular biology new therapeutic protocols. The lecture will cover classical and mosaic phenotypes and the well-known genotype/phenotype correlations.     

Objectives of Course:

  • To familiarize pathologists with neurocutaneous disorders, which usually involve the maxillofacial and oral region and, in particular, with the facial cutaneous and oral mosaic phenotypes that can be currently investigated at the molecular level,   
  • To enable pathologists to distinguish, at a glance, the different forms of neurofibromatosis, the two genetic forms of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, the different forms of Sturge-Weber syndrome, the mixed phenotypes of the Cowden-Lhermitte-Duclos syndrome, the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, and other mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes with pigmentary and vascular manifestations, 
  • To familiarize pathologists with intra- and extracellular gene to protein and signalling pathways, and
  • To increase the confidence in the diagnosis when only soft clinical manifestations are available and how to take advantage from images and pathologic findings.

At the end of this course the participants will:

    • Be familiar with the names and eponyms and the women and men who led to the first descriptions and recognition of neurocutaneous syndromes and their underlying historical background,
    • Familiar with the different neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the maxillofacial and oral region, and in particular, with the mosaic and rarer neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the skin and nervous system,
    • Able to distinguish the different birthmarks leading to a diagnosis at glance, which is important for the purpose of follow-up and a correct genetic counselling,
    • Able to distinguish the main imaging patterns leading to a correct characterisation of neurocutaneous disorders, and 
    • Familiar with the most recent advances in genetics of these disorders and therapeutic strategies.
Research Grant Presentation

The American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology (AAOMP) has established a Research Grant Program to support research and scholarly activities in the area of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. One award for up to $10,000 is available annually for a 12-month period for a proposal that meets the review criteria. The winner will present their research at the AAOMP Annual Meeting.

Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Course Description:

The course will cover the most recent advances on clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects of neurocutaneous disorders, focusing, in each syndrome, on maxillofacial and oral involvement. On handling the whole group, and each specific syndrome, there will be a) a short introductory historical focus on the origin of the syndrome’s name and eponym(s) and on the persons behind the syndrome(s), b) their polymorphous manifestations and c) the most recent advances in their molecular and cellular biology new therapeutic protocols. The lecture will cover classical and mosaic phenotypes and the well-known genotype/phenotype correlations.     

Objectives of Course:

  • To familiarize pathologists with neurocutaneous disorders, which usually involve the maxillofacial and oral region and, in particular, with the facial cutaneous and oral mosaic phenotypes that can be currently investigated at the molecular level,   
  • To enable pathologists to distinguish, at a glance, the different forms of neurofibromatosis, the two genetic forms of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, the different forms of Sturge-Weber syndrome, the mixed phenotypes of the Cowden-Lhermitte-Duclos syndrome, the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, and other mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes with pigmentary and vascular manifestations, 
  • To familiarize pathologists with intra- and extracellular gene to protein and signalling pathways, and
  • To increase the confidence in the diagnosis when only soft clinical manifestations are available and how to take advantage from images and pathologic findings.

At the end of this course the participants will:

    • Be familiar with the names and eponyms and the women and men who led to the first descriptions and recognition of neurocutaneous syndromes and their underlying historical background,
    • Familiar with the different neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the maxillofacial and oral region, and in particular, with the mosaic and rarer neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the skin and nervous system,
    • Able to distinguish the different birthmarks leading to a diagnosis at glance, which is important for the purpose of follow-up and a correct genetic counselling,
    • Able to distinguish the main imaging patterns leading to a correct characterisation of neurocutaneous disorders, and 
    • Familiar with the most recent advances in genetics of these disorders and therapeutic strategies.
Clinical & Translational Research - Oral Pathologists and Scientists: A Focused Discussion on Research Opportunities and Research Careers

Synopsis:
Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology is the scientific discipline at the intersection of medicine and dentistry investigating the etiology and pathophysiology of diseases of the oral and maxillofacial complex. The conduct of oral pathology includes the research and diagnosis of diseases using clinical, radiographic, microscopic, biochemical, or other examinations. For this reason, research is not only a core competency and requirement during training, but also an essential endeavor for the profession. However, a variety of economic and educational pressures have de-emphasized the accessibility and importance of basic science in dental and oral pathology training. A dynamic and ever-changing landscape has led to reductions in the pipeline – and potential competitiveness – of junior faculty oral pathologists conducting research or pursuing research-focused careers. This critically highlights the need for more oral pathology-trained scientists who are conducting research that leads to NIH-funded research programs. Given the increasing overlap in scope of practice with medically trained anatomic pathologists, for oral pathology to remain viable and contemporary, continued emphasis should be placed on research and the creation of new knowledge in the field. Support at the academy level, leveraged through support during training, competitive grant opportunities, and mentorship will be critical.

The purpose of this 1-hour panel discussion is to initiate the discussion with trainees and early career oral pathologists regarding research opportunities and research-focused careers. The panel will present their training and career paths, with an emphasis on points of entry and divergence. Moreover, the long-term vision of this talk is to include cutting edge research seminars at future AAOMP meetings from clinical and translational oral pathologist-scientists to demonstrate the potential, and inspiration for, research-focused careers in oral and maxillofacial pathology.

Format:
A 1-hour open forum panel (3-4 person) discussion with NIH-funded Tenure-track/Tenured oral pathologist-scientists with a focus on insights and overcoming challenges.

Learning Objectives:
1. Entry points for basic, translational, and clinical research for trainees and early career oral and maxillofacial pathologists.
2. Pearls of wisdom, Challenges, and Pitfalls for oral pathologists conducting research: What to do, what not to do.
3. Establishing a groundswell of support for future AAOMP symposia on basic, translational, and clinical research conducted by oral and maxillofacial pathologist investigators.

Founders - Reflectance Confocal Microscopy

Course Description:

In the four hours I will review how reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) can be used instead of performing a biopsy and then reviewing the pathology under a microscope.

Objectives of course:

The audience will understand:

  1. How RCM technology works
  2. The appearance of normal skin with RCM
  3. The terminology confocalists use
  4. The confocal appearance of melanocytic lesions (benign and malignant)
  5. The confocal appearance of non-melanocytic lesions (BCC, sec, AK, solar lentigo, seborrheic keratosis, LPLK, etc)
  6. A review unknown lesions on the face to demonstrate how RCM can be utilized in practice everyday.

At the end of this course the participants will:

The participants will appreciate and understand how this technology could advance their practice and the health of the many patients they serve.

Founders Seminar - Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors of the Head and Neck: Emphasis on WHO Updates and Novel Molecular Alterations

A description of the course:

This course will provide participants with an update on bone and soft tissue neoplasms involving the head/neck region, focusing on updates from the 2020 WHO classification system and newly discovered molecular alterations. The course will be case-based, and discussions will center on individual entities and their differential diagnosis. 

Objectives of course:

  1. Describe diagnostic pitfalls for individual entities and illustrate radiologic findings and ancillary studies that mitigate misdiagnoses.
  2. Discuss the differential diagnosis of common bone and soft tissue tumors arising in the head/neck region based on clinical presentation, radiologic features, and morphology.
  3. Identify ancillary tests that would assist diagnosis, with an emphasis on new molecular diagnostic tests and immunohistochemical surrogates.

At the end of this course the participant . . . 

  1. Will be familiar with the most recent updates in the WHO classification of bone and soft tissue neoplasms involving the head and neck. 
  2. Will understand common pitfalls in the diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors involving the head and neck.
  3. Will be familiar with widely available ancillary immunohistochemical and molecular diagnostic tests the help confirm individual diagnoses, where appropriate.
Clinical Pathology Conference

Clinical Pathology Conference

Case Contributor Case Discussant
Victoria Woo Sarah Aguirre
Mikelle Kernig Stephen Roth
Roman Carlos Maria Cuevas-Nunez
Riya Kuklani Faraj Alotaiby
Ricardo Padilla Kerry Baumann
Nasser Al-Said-Al-Naief Scott Steward-Tharp

Back to schedule

CPC

A description of the course:
Six (6) diagnostically challenging cases contributed by members of the Academy will be analyzed for differential diagnostic discussion by six (6) individual Academy members. The latter individual case discussants are each given minimal information about the presenting complaint/finding and one or more representative clinical photographs and/or imaging. They then present their approach to the differential diagnostic possibilities, given the limited information at hand. Following the case discussant, each respective case contributor will then present the case’s actual diagnostic work up in its entirety. The complete history and examination findings, the differential diagnostic considerations and the final diagnosis will be revealed. The implications of the diagnosis, including its etiology, pathogenesis, management, and prognosis will be discussed.

Objectives of course:

  • To present cases that are diagnostically challenging and/or classic in their presentation, thereby offering an opportunity for participants to expand and enhance their clinical and histopathological acumen.
  • To provide a forum for sharing current understanding of the etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of diseases presenting in the oral-maxillofacial region
  • To share evidence-based knowledge of contemporary approaches to management of diseases, both local and systemic in origin, that can present in the oral-maxillofacial region.
  • To provide information on the prognosis of the conditions presented

At the end of this course the participant . . .

  • Will recognize a range of clinical features, imaging findings and historical information that will enhance their knowledge of pathologic entities, and their approach to differential diagnoses.
  • Will know the pathogenetic mechanisms of the diseases discussed.
  • Will understand how the pathophysiology of each disease impacts the diagnostic workup and rationale for contemporary management options.
  • Will know the prognosis of each of the entities presented–treated and untreated.