2021 Schedule

* All times are Central Daylight Time

* All Speakers have been verified as having no conflicts of interest or relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Saturday, May 22
8:00 am - 24 HoursChat Rooms Available
8:00 am – 4:30 pmHelp Desk Open
8:25 am - 11:30 am

CE Program #1 - AAOMP Seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered(3 Credits)

Dr. John Wright
Dr. Carl Allen
Dr. Brad Neville
Dr. John Fantasia
Dr. Susan Muller - Chair
10:00 am – 10:15 amBreak
11:45 pm – 12:30 pmLunch
12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

CE Program # 2 - AAOMP Symposium: Next Generation Immunohistochemistry
(3 credits)

Dr. Andrew M. Bellizzi
2:00 pm – 2:15 pmBreak
3:45 pm - 4:45 pmProgram Director MeetingProgram Director Members Only
4:00 pm – 5:00 pmADEA Meeting
5:00 pm – 7:00 pmNY Presbyterian Hospital - By invitation onlyBy invitation only:
Zoom Meeting
5:15 pm – 7:15 pmOSU Reunion - By invitation onlyBy invitation only:
Zoom Meeting
5:30 pm – 7:00 pmEmory University ReunionBy invitation only: Zoom meeting

 

Sunday, May 23
24 HoursChat Rooms Available
8:00 am – 3:30 pmHelp Desk Open
8:30 am - 11:30 am

CE Program #3 - Dermatopathology
(3 credits)

Dr. Jerad M. Gardner
10:00 am – 10:15 amBreak
11:30 pm – 12:15 pmLunch
12:15 pm – 12:30 pmADA UpdateDr. Daniel J. Klemmedson - ADA President
12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

CE Program #4 - Is this a ___________? Common and uncommon pitfalls and mimics in salivary tumors
(3 credits)

Dr. Raja M. Seethala
1:45 pm – 2:00 pmBreak
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmCAOMPOMBy invitation only
4:30 pm - 6:00 pmIndiana University Memorial SeminarBy invitation only: Zoom Meeting

 

Monday, May 24
24 HoursChat Rooms Available
8:00 am – 6:30 pmHelp Desk Open
8:00 am - 11:30 amOral Essay Program
(3.5 credits)
9:45 am – 10:00 amBreak
11:30 am – 12:15 pmLunch
11:30 am – 12:15 pmUPMC/Pitt ReunionBy Invitation Only
11:30 am – 12:15 pmEducation Committee Meeting
12:15 pm – 2:15 pm

Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies
(2 credits)

Dr. Martino Ruggieri
2:15 pm – 2:30 pmBreak
2:30 pm – 4:30 pmFellows Business Meeting
4:30 pm – 6:30 pmResident Case Exchange
4:30 pm - 5:30 pmLab Director MeetingLab Director Members Only
Tuesday, May 25 
8:00 am – 5:00 pmChat Rooms Available
8:00 am – 6:30 pmHelp Desk Open
8:00 am - 11:00 amPosters
(3 credits)
(Presenters must be available
from 9:00 am – 11:00 am)
11:00 am – 11:30 amLunch
11:30 am – 1:45 pmClinical Pathology Conference
(2 credits)
Dr. Paul C. Edwards - Chair
Case Contributor:
Victoria Woo
Mikelle Kernig
Roman Carlos
Riya Kuklani
Ricardo Padilla
Nasser Al-Said-Al-Naief

Case Discussant:
Sarah Aguirre
Stephen Roth
Maria Cuevas-Nunez
Faraj Alotaiby
Kerry Baumann
Scott Steward-Tharp
1:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Founders Seminar: Reflectance Confocal Microscopy
(4 credits)

Dr. Jane M. Grant-Kels
2:45 pm – 3:00 pmBreak
5:45 pm – 6:00 pmClosing Remarks
AAOMP seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.
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AAOMP seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.

Course Descriptions & Objectives

 

Click on a session below for more details
AAOMP seminar: A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.
CE Program #1 - AAOMP Seminar - A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

A Presidential Perspective: Memorable and Enlightening Cases I Have Encountered

Course Description:

Five past Presidents of AAOMP will present cases that were diagnostically and/or clinically challenging.  The presenters will discuss memorable cases in their long careers as oral pathologists, sharing their journey, sometimes decades in the making, to arrive at a diagnosis. Virtual slide scans and short case histories will be made available to course participants ahead of time so that participants can submit their diagnoses for discussion at the seminar. The cases will be selected to cover a range of histopathologic diagnoses and each poses a diagnostic challenge that will stimulate discussion and review of the pertinent literature. 

Objectives of course: 

  1. Examine microscopic pathology of specific entities presented that represent diagnostic challenges or share overlapping histopathologic and/or clinical features with other entities and discuss them in the context of related pathologic conditions. 
  2. Discuss the importance of clinical correlation with the histomorphology, immunohistochemical staining and at times the molecular genetics to arrive at a diagnosis. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  1. Have increased their insight into the histopathologic presentation for the cases discussed here, including the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses and disease classification. 
  2. Have reviewed the recent literature pertaining to this diverse set of entities. 
  3. Have refined their approach to diagnosis of this group of lesions.
  4. Be familiar with the management and/or treatment for each of these entities.

Back to schedule

AAOMP Symposium - Next Generation Immunohistochemistry

Course Description:

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has broad applications in diagnostic pathology, including diagnosis of broad tumor class (i.e., carcinoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, melanoma, etc.), tumor subtype, and site of origin. This course will present a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to tumor diagnosis, built on the backbone of an epidemiologically sound, H&E-driven pattern-based approach. Central to this contemporary immunohistochemical approach is the application of “next generation immunohistochemistry,” defined here as markers identified though discovery in the fields of molecular genetics and developmental biology.

This first half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to high-grade neoplasms of uncertain lineage, with discussions of broad tumor classes and associated screening markers, so-called “non-canonical expression” of these screening markers, the immunohistochemical workup of the small round blue cell tumor, and the concept of dedifferentiation.

The second half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to the carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), with discussions of carcinoma subtype, coordinate expression of CK7/CK20, and immunohistochemical algorithms useful in so-called “garden variety adenocarcinoma,” primary surface ovarian carcinoma vs metastasis, CUP at other sites, the distinction of squamous cell carcinoma from urothelial carcinoma, and site of origin assessment in NET and NEC.

Objectives of course:

The goal of this course is to learn a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to assign tumor type in high-grade neoplasms or uncertain lineage and to definite site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary. 

Judicious use of IHC is emphasized, in particular, because at present every oncopathology specimen should be considered a potential molecular pathology specimen. 

The discussion will be case-based and pitfalls will be emphasized throughout. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Understand the concept of “next generation immunohistochemistry” and how it applies to tumor diagnosis.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains, including screening and differentiation markers, for tumor diagnosis.
  • Recognize patterns of non-canonical expression of screening makers, so as to avoid diagnostic errors.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains to assign site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary.
  • Understand the concept of dedifferentiation and appreciate how it contributes to diagnostic uncertainty.
CE Program #2 - AAOMP Symposium - “Next Generation Immunohistochemistry”

Next Generation Immunohistochemistry

Course Description:

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has broad applications in diagnostic pathology, including diagnosis of broad tumor class (i.e., carcinoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, melanoma, etc.), tumor subtype, and site of origin. This course will present a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to tumor diagnosis, built on the backbone of an epidemiologically sound, H&E-driven pattern-based approach. Central to this contemporary immunohistochemical approach is the application of “next generation immunohistochemistry,” defined here as markers identified though discovery in the fields of molecular genetics and developmental biology.

This first half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to high-grade neoplasms of uncertain lineage, with discussions of broad tumor classes and associated screening markers, so-called “non-canonical expression” of these screening markers, the immunohistochemical workup of the small round blue cell tumor, and the concept of dedifferentiation.

The second half of the course will focus on an immunohistochemical approach to the carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP), with discussions of carcinoma subtype, coordinate expression of CK7/CK20, and immunohistochemical algorithms useful in so-called “garden variety adenocarcinoma,” primary surface ovarian carcinoma vs metastasis, CUP at other sites, the distinction of squamous cell carcinoma from urothelial carcinoma, and site of origin assessment in NET and NEC.

Objectives of course:

The goal of this course is to learn a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to assign tumor type in high-grade neoplasms or uncertain lineage and to definite site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary. 

Judicious use of IHC is emphasized, in particular, because at present every oncopathology specimen should be considered a potential molecular pathology specimen. 

The discussion will be case-based and pitfalls will be emphasized throughout. 

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Understand the concept of “next generation immunohistochemistry” and how it applies to tumor diagnosis.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains, including screening and differentiation markers, for tumor diagnosis.
  • Recognize patterns of non-canonical expression of screening makers, so as to avoid diagnostic errors.
  • Apply a judicious panel of immunohistochemical stains to assign site of origin in the carcinoma of unknown primary.
  • Understand the concept of dedifferentiation and appreciate how it contributes to diagnostic uncertainty.

Back to schedule

Dermatopathology

Course Description:

The focus will be on providing a practical approach to dermatopathology for the oral & maxillofacial pathologist.

Objectives of course:

  • Recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Will recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Will avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Will appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions
CE Program #3 - Dermatopathology

Dermatopathology

Course Description:

The focus will be on providing a practical approach to dermatopathology for the oral & maxillofacial pathologist.

Objectives of course:

  • Recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions

At the end of this course the participants will:

  • Will recognize common skin lesions of the head and neck
  • Will avoid pitfalls in dermatopathology
  • Will appropriately utilize immunohistochemistry in workup of select lesions

Back to schedule

Is this a ___________? Common and uncommon pitfalls and mimics in salivary tumors

Course Description:

Salivary gland tumors are often difficult to distinguish from one another.  However, non salivary type tumors may masquerade as primary salivary gland lesions as well, adding further challenge to tumor classification.  Nonstandard approaches are often required to delineate some of these mimics from true salivary gland tumors.  Conversely, salivary type tumors may masquerade as non salivary lesions, particularly at uncommon sites.  

Objectives of course:

Provide a framework and philosophy to resolve the rare but impactful scenarios of salivary gland tumors mimicking non salivary tumors and vice versa.

Utilize morphologic, clinical and immunophenotypic features to recognize mimics of the most common salivary gland malignancy, mucoepidermoid carcinoma

Outline approaches to identifying and categorizing mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors that present as salivary gland lesions

Document key findings important to recognizing salivary type tumors at uncommon head and neck sites.  

At the end of this course the participants will:

Recognize key histologic features that delineate mucoepidermoid carcinoma from mimics.

Identify morphologic and immunophenotypic features that should raise suspicion for non salivary type lesions including mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors.

Recognize features that can establish a primary salivary gland tumor at less common head and neck sites.

CE Program #4 - Is this a ___________? Common and uncommon pitfalls and mimics in salivary tumors

Is this a ___________? Common and uncommon pitfalls and mimics in salivary tumors

Course Description:

Salivary gland tumors are often difficult to distinguish from one another.  However, non salivary type tumors may masquerade as primary salivary gland lesions as well, adding further challenge to tumor classification.  Nonstandard approaches are often required to delineate some of these mimics from true salivary gland tumors.  Conversely, salivary type tumors may masquerade as non salivary lesions, particularly at uncommon sites.  

Objectives of course:

Provide a framework and philosophy to resolve the rare but impactful scenarios of salivary gland tumors mimicking non salivary tumors and vice versa.

Utilize morphologic, clinical and immunophenotypic features to recognize mimics of the most common salivary gland malignancy, mucoepidermoid carcinoma

Outline approaches to identifying and categorizing mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors that present as salivary gland lesions

Document key findings important to recognizing salivary type tumors at uncommon head and neck sites.  

At the end of this course the participants will:

Recognize key histologic features that delineate mucoepidermoid carcinoma from mimics.

Identify morphologic and immunophenotypic features that should raise suspicion for non salivary type lesions including mesenchymal and round blue cell tumors.

Recognize features that can establish a primary salivary gland tumor at less common head and neck sites.

Back to schedule

Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Course Description:

The course will cover the most recent advances on clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects of neurocutaneous disorders, focusing, in each syndrome, on maxillofacial and oral involvement. On handling the whole group, and each specific syndrome, there will be a) a short introductory historical focus on the origin of the syndrome’s name and eponym(s) and on the persons behind the syndrome(s), b) their polymorphous manifestations and c) the most recent advances in their molecular and cellular biology new therapeutic protocols. The lecture will cover classical and mosaic phenotypes and the well-known genotype/phenotype correlations.     

Objectives of Course:

  • To familiarize pathologists with neurocutaneous disorders, which usually involve the maxillofacial and oral region and, in particular, with the facial cutaneous and oral mosaic phenotypes that can be currently investigated at the molecular level,   
  • To enable pathologists to distinguish, at a glance, the different forms of neurofibromatosis, the two genetic forms of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, the different forms of Sturge-Weber syndrome, the mixed phenotypes of the Cowden-Lhermitte-Duclos syndrome, the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, and other mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes with pigmentary and vascular manifestations, 
  • To familiarize pathologists with intra- and extracellular gene to protein and signalling pathways, and
  • To increase the confidence in the diagnosis when only soft clinical manifestations are available and how to take advantage from images and pathologic findings.

At the end of this course the participants will:

    • Be familiar with the names and eponyms and the women and men who led to the first descriptions and recognition of neurocutaneous syndromes and their underlying historical background,
    • Familiar with the different neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the maxillofacial and oral region, and in particular, with the mosaic and rarer neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the skin and nervous system,
    • Able to distinguish the different birthmarks leading to a diagnosis at glance, which is important for the purpose of follow-up and a correct genetic counselling,
    • Able to distinguish the main imaging patterns leading to a correct characterisation of neurocutaneous disorders, and 
    • Familiar with the most recent advances in genetics of these disorders and therapeutic strategies.
Gorlin Lecture - Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Neurocutaneous Disorders: from the persons behind the syndromes to the molecular pathways and targeted therapies

Course Description:

The course will cover the most recent advances on clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects of neurocutaneous disorders, focusing, in each syndrome, on maxillofacial and oral involvement. On handling the whole group, and each specific syndrome, there will be a) a short introductory historical focus on the origin of the syndrome’s name and eponym(s) and on the persons behind the syndrome(s), b) their polymorphous manifestations and c) the most recent advances in their molecular and cellular biology new therapeutic protocols. The lecture will cover classical and mosaic phenotypes and the well-known genotype/phenotype correlations.     

Objectives of Course:

  • To familiarize pathologists with neurocutaneous disorders, which usually involve the maxillofacial and oral region and, in particular, with the facial cutaneous and oral mosaic phenotypes that can be currently investigated at the molecular level,   
  • To enable pathologists to distinguish, at a glance, the different forms of neurofibromatosis, the two genetic forms of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, the different forms of Sturge-Weber syndrome, the mixed phenotypes of the Cowden-Lhermitte-Duclos syndrome, the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, and other mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes with pigmentary and vascular manifestations, 
  • To familiarize pathologists with intra- and extracellular gene to protein and signalling pathways, and
  • To increase the confidence in the diagnosis when only soft clinical manifestations are available and how to take advantage from images and pathologic findings.

At the end of this course the participants will:

    • Be familiar with the names and eponyms and the women and men who led to the first descriptions and recognition of neurocutaneous syndromes and their underlying historical background,
    • Familiar with the different neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the maxillofacial and oral region, and in particular, with the mosaic and rarer neurocutaneous phenotypes involving the skin and nervous system,
    • Able to distinguish the different birthmarks leading to a diagnosis at glance, which is important for the purpose of follow-up and a correct genetic counselling,
    • Able to distinguish the main imaging patterns leading to a correct characterisation of neurocutaneous disorders, and 
    • Familiar with the most recent advances in genetics of these disorders and therapeutic strategies.

Back to schedule

Founders - Reflectance Confocal Microscopy

Course Description:

In the four hours I will review how reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) can be used instead of performing a biopsy and then reviewing the pathology under a microscope.

Objectives of course:

The audience will understand:

  1. How RCM technology works
  2. The appearance of normal skin with RCM
  3. The terminology confocalists use
  4. The confocal appearance of melanocytic lesions (benign and malignant)
  5. The confocal appearance of non-melanocytic lesions (BCC, sec, AK, solar lentigo, seborrheic keratosis, LPLK, etc)
  6. A review unknown lesions on the face to demonstrate how RCM can be utilized in practice everyday.

At the end of this course the participants will:

The participants will appreciate and understand how this technology could advance their practice and the health of the many patients they serve.

Founders Seminar - Reflectance Confocal Microscopy

Reflectance Confocal Microscopy

Course Description:

In the four hours I will review how reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) can be used instead of performing a biopsy and then reviewing the pathology under a microscope.

Objectives of course:

The audience will understand:

  1. How RCM technology works
  2. The appearance of normal skin with RCM
  3. The terminology confocalists use
  4. The confocal appearance of melanocytic lesions (benign and malignant)
  5. The confocal appearance of non-melanocytic lesions (BCC, sec, AK, solar lentigo, seborrheic keratosis, LPLK, etc)
  6. A review unknown lesions on the face to demonstrate how RCM can be utilized in practice everyday.

At the end of this course the participants will:

The participants will appreciate and understand how this technology could advance their practice and the health of the many patients they serve.

Back to schedule